Category Archives: Open Source

Fujitsu Simulates Graphene Device Using Open Source Tool

Fujitsu announced the simulation of a 3030 Atom Nano device here on January 14th, 2013. The simulation took 20 hours on their supercomputer to simulate the electrical properties of graphene and an insulating layer, using OpenMX Material Explorer.

Even more interesting is the news that OpenMX is an open source tool available from openmx-square.org under the terms of the GPL.

MOS-AK GSA December 2013

Presentations from the 6th International MOS-AK/GSA Workshop on Dec.11, 2013 in Washington DC are now available from http://www.mos-ak.org/washington_dc_2013/.

It was organized to discuss SPICE/compact modeling and its standardization. There are presentations about the the various compact modeling initiatives going on in industry and academia.

You can keep track of MOS-AK’s work by signing up for their mailing list at: http://www.mos-ak.org/. They also have a listing of future events concerning compact modeling.

Aestimo version 0.9

Sefer Bora Lişesivdin announced the release of Aestimo GPL 1D Schrödinger-Poisson solver last month. From his announcement on LinkedIn:

Aestimo Team is proud to release the version 0.9 of Aestimo 1D Self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson Solver. This version includes many bugfixes, speed improvements, cython code additions, rewritten VBMAT-V part to use numpy better, merging conduction and valance band calculations and more. Code is heavily modified and stabilized.

The software is available for download from: https://bitbucket.org/sblisesivdin/aestimo/downloads.

Xyce Parallel Circuit Simulator is open source

Sandia National Laboratories has open sourced their parallel circuit simulator.  Also available is documentation and a full set of regressions.  Check out their site at http://xyce.sandia.gov. From their site: Xyce is an open source, SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, capable of solving extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms. It also supports serial execution on all common desktop platforms, and small-scale parallel runs on Unix-like systems. In addition to analog electronic simulation, Xyce has also been used to investigate more general network systems, such as neural networks and power grids. Xyce developer Eric Keiter has an announcement here on SemiWiki.